Network Security - Introduction to Network Security

Prerequisites: This is the 4th course in the intermediate, undergraduate-level offering that makes up the larger Cybersecurity Fundamentals MicroBachelors Program. We recommend taking them in order, unless you have a background in these areas already and feel comfortable skipping ahead.Information Security - Introduction to Information SecurityInformation Security - Authentication and Access ControlInformation Security - Advanced TopicsNetwork Security - Introduction to Network SecurityNetwork Security - ProtocolsNetwork Security - Advanced TopicsPenetration Testing - Discovering VulnerabilitiesPenetration Testing - ExploitationPenetration Testing - Post ExploitationThese topics build upon the learnings that are taught in the introductory-level Computer Science Fundamentals MicroBachelors program, offered by the same instructor. Learn fundamentals of network security, including a deep dive into how networks are attacked by malicious users. 5 Weeks 8-10 Hours per week recommended
5991

Please select the start dates for your courses below.

Scheduled Start:

About This Course:

This is the 4th course in the intermediate, undergraduate-level offering that makes up the larger Cybersecurity Fundamentals MicroBachelors Program. We recommend taking them in order, unless you have a background in these areas already and feel comfortable skipping ahead.

What You’ll Learn:

Describe how “social engineering” can be used to compromise securityDefine the CIA triadIdentify and plan to manage risks in common situationsDefine a threat tree and threat matrix and explain how they are usedDefine an attack tree, explain how boolean and continuous node values are used in attack trees, and demonstrate how an attack tree can be used to determine vulnerabilitiesExplain why it is important for network engineers to understand cyber attack strategies.List and summarize the stages of network attack methodologyIdentify the information an attacker might collect during network reconnaissanceDescribe at least two “low tech” ways of performing reconnaissance on a targetPerform a WHOIS query and extract the IP address of a DNS serverList at least three publicly available tools used for gathering information on targetsDefine port scanning and describe the process used to determine whether a port is openDefine a proxy serverDefine IP spoofing, ingress filtering, and session hijackingDefine a Denial of Service attack and explain the difference between a DoS and DDoS attackState the relationship between DoS attacks and geopolitical eventsList at least two vulnerability attacks used in DoS attacksDefine SYN flooding and explain how it can be protected againstDescribe what happens during a standard DDoS attackExplain how DNS poisoning can be used in phishing attacksDescribe how URLs can be obfuscated to make a phishing attack more likely to succeedList at least two tools used to assess vulnerabilities in networksSummarize the typical goals of post-exploitation activityDescribe the strategies attackers use to maintain access to a compromised systemDefine trojans, viruses, worms, and blended threatsList the typical objectives of trojan creatorsDefine rootkitsGive examples of common uses of NetcatDefine wrappersSummarize common data exfiltration methodsSummarize how attackers can remove evidence of system compromise in Windows and Unix systems

Meet Your Instructor:

Aspen Olmsted

Adjunct Professor at New York University Tandon School of Engineering Aspen Olmsted is an adjunct faculty member in the New York University Tandon School of Engineering in the Computer Science and Engineering department. Aspen's fulltime job is as an assistant professor and Graduate program director at the College of Charleston. He obtained a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from The University of South Carolina. Before his academic career, he was CEO of Alliance Software Corporation. Alliance Software developed N-Tier enterprise applications for the performing arts and humanities market. Dr Olmsted’s research focus is on the development of algorithms and architectures for distributed enterprise solutions that can guarantee security and correctness while maintaining high-availability. In his Secure Data Engineering Lab, Aspen mentors over a dozen graduate and undergraduate students each year
5991

Duration

5 weeks

Learning Partner

New York University (NYUx)

Pacing

Self-paced

Program Type

MicroBachelors®

Subject

Computer Science