What is a bootcamp?

Our facilitated bootcamps focus on rapid skill acquisition by progressing you through a standard course on an accelerated schedule with peers who are committed to progressing on pace. Our bootcamps include:

  • Live kick-off event
  • Instructor facilitated Q&A for expert feedback and coaching
  • Learner Success Support: welcome call, advising sessions, personalized pace reminders
  • 24/7 help desk

About This Course:

This bootcamp has a focus on learning the most commonly used project management methodologies in the IT field, and why they are effective. This bootcamp introduces you to project management standards and frameworks that increase efficiency and deliver tangible business benefits to IT projects.

Topics include:

  • Relationships among projects, programs and portfolios
  • Organizational culture and project management roles
  • Project management methods and lifecycles and their applications

This course can be used towards completion of a Professional Certificate in IT Project Management.

What You Will Learn:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Explain why organizations use project management to deliver business value
  • Describe the relationships among projects, programs and portfolios
  • Define the differences between predictive, iterative and Agile-based lifecycles
  • Analyze different project management roles – project manager, sponsor, stakeholder, ScrumMaster, product owner and developer
  • Understand how organizational culture can influence the role of the project manager

Meet Your Instructor:

Debra Hildebrand

Instructor of Project Management at University of Washington
Debra Hildebrand has over 15 years’ experience in project management consulting and training for private firms and public agencies (federal, state and local level). Her specialties include strategic planning and implementation, organizational redesign and restructure, project management, and quality assurance oversight. Certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute, Debra is an instructor at the University of Washington, Stanford University, and City University of Seattle. She has an MBA from the Columbia Business School and is the principal of Hildebrand Solutions, a project management training and consultation firm.

About this course

The Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) in any given organization serves a leadership position, protecting the data and digital systems that a company and it’s employees as well as its customers depend upon.

This course delves into the role that the CISO plays in cybersecurity operations.

Throughout the lessons, learners will explore answers to the following questions: How does cybersecurity work across industries? What is the professionals’ point of view? How do we keep information secure?

Coursework will fully explore the CISO’s view from the top, as well as the position’s toolkit, which includes policy, procedures and practices, technologies, awareness training, and audit. It will also dive into the approaches taken in private industry, government, academia, and the military.

What you will learn

  • Identify the four domains of cybersecurity and the differences between their rules, regulations, and desired outcomes;
  • Explain the role of the CISO across all domains, and the differences between CISO roles among the domains;
  • Identify cybersecurity specific tools for their appropriate domains and situations.

Who can take this course

Unfortunately, learners from one or more of the following countries or regions will not be able to register for this course: Iran, Cuba and the Crimea region of Ukraine. While edX has sought licenses from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) to offer our courses to learners in these countries and regions, the licenses we have received are not broad enough to allow us to offer this course in all locations. EdX truly regrets that U.S. sanctions prevent us from offering all of our courses to everyone, no matter where they live.

Meet your instructor

Barbara Endicott-Popovsky

Director, Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity at University of Washington
Barbara Endicott-Popovsky is the director of the Center for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity. She also teaches cybersecurity in several University of Washington programs. Endicott-Popovsky is a member of several national committees shaping cybersecurity education. She earned her doctoral degree from the Center for Secure and Dependable Systems in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Idaho.

About MIT horizon

MIT Horizon is an expansive content library built to help you explore emerging technologies. Through easy-to-understand lessons, you’ll be guided through the complexities of the latest technologies and simplified expert-level concepts. Designed for both technical and non-technical learners, you can examine bite-size content that can lead to maximum career outcomes.

For a limited time, gain access to the complete MIT Horizon library.

Register today for exclusive entry.

What you will learn

  • Describe what networking is and how it can help you reach your professional goals.
  • Identify your goals for networking.
  • Introduce yourself in English, keep a conversation going, and leave the conversation.
  • Write professional emails to make new contacts and follow up with people in your network.
  • Identify your network and your unique characteristics and skills.
  • Use LinkedIn and business cards to make and maintain connections with your network.
  • Use informational interviews to expand your network.

Courses in this program

1
Conducting an Informational Interview

Course Details
This is the capstone networking course. Put all the skills that you have learned into practice. You’ll introduce yourself, write effective email, highlight your best qualities, and conduct an informational interview with a person of your choice.

2
Preparing to Network in English

Course Details
Learn the basics of networking while you grow your social network and professional connections. Practice speaking to improve your English language skills for increased success in job hunting.

3
Using Email for Networking in English

Course Details
Improve your writing skills. Write effective emails including great subject lines, greetings, and closings. You’ll be more confident as you communicate for business, send messages, expand your network, and search for jobs in English.

4
Attending a Networking Event

Course Details
Improve your ability to meet new people. Learn to give an “elevator pitch” (speech) to introduce yourself to new people and to highlight your key qualities. Make connections with people and use your skills to attend a networking event.

Meet your instructors

Daphne Mackey

Daphne Mackey is an ESL teacher and the author of sixteen ESL textbooks. Daphne received her M.Ed. and MBA at Boston University, where she taught in the Center for English Language Programs (CELOP) for nine years. For the past thirty years, she has been working in the English Language Programs at the University of Washington. She has also taught in the MBA program at Pacific Lutheran University and done training in multicultural/global team management at northwest companies. In her free time, Daphne enjoys sailing and hiking with her family.

Joel Ozretich

Joel Ozretich has over 15 years of experience teaching English in both in the US and abroad in South Korea and Japan. Since 2006, he has been teaching at the University of Washington where he specializes in teaching Business English courses such as Marketing for International Professionals, Writing for Business, and Business Communications. Prior to teaching, he worked as a reporter at the Puget Sound Business Journal in Seattle. He holds a Master’s in Teaching ESOL and Bachelor’s undergraduate degrees in Broadcast Journalism and International Studies from the University of Washington.

Richard Moore

Richard Moore is a lecturer in the International and English Language Programs at the University of Washington in Seattle. He has been a teacher for over 20 years. He is originally from England just outside of London, and has taught English in the U.K., Australia, and Korea. Richard decided to become a teacher of English because he loves languages, traveling and working with different groups of people from around the world.

Program endorsements

In today’s global arena, the ability to collaborate effectively with others is an essential competency for professionals. Mastering the listening and communication skills involved requires an investment in learning and practice. The benefits include building a rich personal network to support your personal and professional objectives, leveraging the resources and talent of teams, and establishing understanding and trust that translates into productive working relationships. Our mission at Fluency Group is empowering people and organizations to communicate, collaborate and perform on the global stage to achieve their goals, and we’re happy to support this valuable program by the University of Washington which supports this endeavor.

Heidi Schumann , CEO, Fluency Group

In today’s global arena, the ability to collaborate effectively with others is an essential competency for professionals. Mastering the listening and communication skills involved requires an investment in learning and practice. The benefits include building a rich personal network to support your personal and professional objectives, leveraging the resources and talent of teams, and establishing understanding and trust that translates into productive working relationships. Our mission at Fluency Group is empowering people and organizations to communicate, collaborate and perform on the global stage to achieve their goals, and we’re happy to support this valuable program by the University of Washington which supports this endeavor.

Heidi Schumann , CEO, Fluency Group

About this course

In this final course of the English for Business Networking Professional Certificate program, you’ll put your knowledge into practice by preparing for and conducting an informational interview.

First off, you’ll clarify your goals and set up a practice informational interview. You’ll practice talking on the phone to make arrangements to meet. Then, you’ll set up a second informational interview. You’ll learn how to research a person and write questions to learn more about them or their career. You’ll also learn the parts of an interview.

Finally, you’ll learn the key steps for following up with a person after your interview. You’ll successfully complete a whole cycle of networking activities.

What you’ll learn

  • Research a person you would like to interview using LinkedIn and other tools.
  • Prepare for and conduct an informational interview with someone you already know, and follow up with a thank-you note.
  • Prepare for and conduct an informational interview with a new contact
  • Follow up with a thank-you note.
  • Share your lessons learned about informational interviews and networking

Meet your instructor

Joel Ozretich

Joel Ozretich has over 15 years of experience teaching English in both in the US and abroad in South Korea and Japan. Since 2006, he has been teaching at the University of Washington where he specializes in teaching Business English courses such as Marketing for International Professionals, Writing for Business, and Business Communications. Prior to teaching, he worked as a reporter at the Puget Sound Business Journal in Seattle. He holds a Master’s in Teaching ESOL and Bachelor’s undergraduate degrees in Broadcast Journalism and International Studies from the University of Washington.

Richard Moore

Richard Moore is a lecturer in the International and English Language Programs at the University of Washington in Seattle. He has been a teacher for over 20 years. He is originally from England just outside of London, and has taught English in the U.K., Australia, and Korea. Richard decided to become a teacher of English because he loves languages, traveling and working with different groups of people from around the world.

Frequently asked questions

Q: Do I need to take the courses in order?
A: We recommend you take the courses in order. Many of the topics build from one course to the next, but there is no strict requirement.

Q: I don’t know many people, so how can I network?
A: Everyone has a network. The course will help you identify the people that you already know and help you figure out strategies to make your network bigger.

Q: My English isn’t very strong. Is this course right for me?
A: This course is designed for people with an intermediate level or above. That means you should be able to talk about everyday topics. If you are a beginner, some of the activities might be difficult, but you can still learn from them.

Q: I’m quite fluent in English. Is this too basic for me?
This course is designed for people at an intermediate level in English. Some of the vocabulary might be easy for you, but you can probably benefit from the activities.

Q: I’m not studying business. Is this course okay for me?
Yes, networking is all about making connections. You can use networking in any major, career, or location.

About this course

In this course, you’ll focus on two key parts of networking.

In the first part, you will focus on an elevator pitch, a short speech to highlight the qualities that are important to finding a job or making a connection.
You’ll practice giving your speech and get feedback on your content, vocabulary, and pronunciation.

The second part of the course is about networking events. These are informal meetings to make connections with people in a certain area. You’ll practicemaking “small talk” andyou’ll get better at making conversation and endingconversations. You’ll also know how to dress for success and attend your own networking event.

We’re sure your network will grow after you take these steps.

What you’ll learn

  • Create and deliver an “elevator pitch”
  • Find a networking event you would like to attend
  • Make small talk
  • Prepare for and attend a networking event
  • Add at least one new person to your network

Meet your instructor

Joel Ozretich

Joel Ozretich has over 15 years of experience teaching English in both in the US and abroad in South Korea and Japan. Since 2006, he has been teaching at the University of Washington where he specializes in teaching Business English courses such as Marketing for International Professionals, Writing for Business, and Business Communications. Prior to teaching, he worked as a reporter at the Puget Sound Business Journal in Seattle. He holds a Master’s in Teaching ESOL and Bachelor’s undergraduate degrees in Broadcast Journalism and International Studies from the University of Washington.

Richard Moore

Richard Moore is a lecturer in the International and English Language Programs at the University of Washington in Seattle. He has been a teacher for over 20 years. He is originally from England just outside of London, and has taught English in the U.K., Australia, and Korea. Richard decided to become a teacher of English because he loves languages, traveling and working with different groups of people from around the world.

About this course

Effective writing is an important business skill, especially for networking, and most communication takes place using email.

In this course, you’ll learn important vocabulary and strategies for writing effective emails, starting with the subject line. You’ll learn how to write messages for different audiences and understand when to be formal or direct. You’ll also learn how your choice of words can change the way people view your message.You’ll practice writing emails to follow up with people in your network.

What you’ll learn

  • Create and use email messages, including greetings, body of message, format, and closing
  • Use appropriate tone and formality in your emails
  • Use email to invite a person in your network to meet with you
  • Write follow-up emails

Syllabus

Week 1:Subject Lines & Openings
This week you’ll learn the parts of an effective subject line and know what common mistakes to avoid. You’ll also know how to using greetings like “Dear” and when to use titles or first names.

Week 2: Tone: When to be Formal or Direct
This week introduces the idea of tone. The words you use and the way you say it make your writing more or less formal and more or less direct. You need to make choices about these things depending on who you are writing to.

Week 3:Effective Beginnings and Endings
The first and last lines of an email are super important to success. We’ll point out how to write good openings and closings and provide useful vocabulary for these parts. We’ll also practice the language of making arrangements to meet.

Week 4:Writing Follow Up Emails
In the final week of the course, you’ll look specifically at the language of following up. This is an important step in making your network bigger.You’ll practice writing your own email and get feedback from your fellow classmates.

Meet your instructor

Daphne Mackey

Daphne Mackey is an ESL teacher and the author of sixteen ESL textbooks. Daphne received her M.Ed. and MBA at Boston University, where she taught in the Center for English Language Programs (CELOP) for nine years. For the past thirty years, she has been working in the English Language Programs at the University of Washington. She has also taught in the MBA program at Pacific Lutheran University and done training in multicultural/global team management at northwest companies. In her free time, Daphne enjoys sailing and hiking with her family.

Richard Moore

Richard Moore is a lecturer in the International and English Language Programs at the University of Washington in Seattle. He has been a teacher for over 20 years. He is originally from England just outside of London, and has taught English in the U.K., Australia, and Korea. Richard decided to become a teacher of English because he loves languages, traveling and working with different groups of people from around the world.

Frequently asked questions

Q: Do I need to take the courses in order?
A: We recommend you take the courses in order. Many of the topics build from one course to the next, but there is no strict requirement.

Q: I don’t know many people, so how can I network?
A: Everyone has a network. The course will help you identify the people that you already know and help you figure out strategies to make your network bigger.

Q: My English isn’t very strong. Is this course right for me?
A: This course is designed for people with an intermediate level or above. That means you should be able to talk about everyday topics. If you are a beginner, some of the activities might be difficult, but you can still learn from them.

Q: I’m quite fluent in English. Is this too basic for me?
This course is designed for people at an intermediate level in English. Some of the vocabulary might be easy for you, but you can probably benefit from the activities.

Q: I’m not studying business. Is this course okay for me?
Yes, networking is all about making connections. You can use networking in any major, career, or location.

About this course

Networking in the business world is key to career success. Research shows that many jobs are never officially advertised. Many companies rely on word-of-mouth advertising to hire employees, so connections with people are important!

It’s also clear that English is an important language in the global job hunt.

But what exactly is networking? And how do you do it in English? This course helps you understand the basics of networking and why it’s important. You’ll identify the key qualities that you personally want to focus on developing.

Most importantly, you’ll grow and expand your business network and professional connections. Gain confidence in your speaking while introducing yourself in English. You’ll also learn about business culture in North America and around the globe while you improve your English language skills for increased success in networking and job hunting.

What you’ll learn

  • Identify your goal for networking
  • Define your network and make decisions on how to grow it
  • Identify your unique skills and qualities
  • Make effective introductions for yourself and others
  • Use LinkedIn and business cards to make and maintain connections with your network
  • Use culturally appropriate greetings and customs

Syllabus

Week 1: What is Networking?
Introduction to networking and an overview of the reasons for networking, such as getting a job or a promotion or expanding your sales portfolio. You’ll also define your goals and share ideas with fellow learners around the globe.

Week 2: Who is in Your Network?
Identify the people who are part of your own personal network. Analyze and decide who you want to connect with most. Pinpoint reasons for helping others and getting help yourself. Discuss priorities with your fellow learners.

Week 3: Introductions
Learn key language to introduce yourself and to make introductions. Take a quiz on key language and practice introducing yourself.Record an introduction and get feedback from fellow learners.

Week 4: Making Contact
Learn how to introduce yourself in a business setting. Give and receive business cards and develop a LinkedIn profile headline and summary.

Meet your instructor

Joel Ozretich

Joel Ozretich has over 15 years of experience teaching English in both in the US and abroad in South Korea and Japan. Since 2006, he has been teaching at the University of Washington where he specializes in teaching Business English courses such as Marketing for International Professionals, Writing for Business, and Business Communications. Prior to teaching, he worked as a reporter at the Puget Sound Business Journal in Seattle. He holds a Master’s in Teaching ESOL and Bachelor’s undergraduate degrees in Broadcast Journalism and International Studies from the University of Washington.

Richard Moore

Richard Moore is a lecturer in the International and English Language Programs at the University of Washington in Seattle. He has been a teacher for over 20 years. He is originally from England just outside of London, and has taught English in the U.K., Australia, and Korea. Richard decided to become a teacher of English because he loves languages, traveling and working with different groups of people from around the world.

Frequently asked questions

Q: Do I need to take the courses in order?
A: We recommend you take the courses in order. Many of the topics build from one course to the next, but there is no strict requirement.

Q: I don’t know many people, so how can I network?
A: Everyone has a network. The course will help you identify the people that you already know and help you figure out strategies to make your network bigger.

Q: My English isn’t very strong. Is this course right for me?
A: This course is designed for people with an intermediate level or above. That means you should be able to talk about everyday topics. If you are a beginner, some of the activities might be difficult, but you can still learn from them.

Q: I’m quite fluent in English. Is this too basic for me?
This course is designed for people at an intermediate level in English. Some of the vocabulary might be easy for you, but you can probably benefit from the activities.

Q: I’m not studying business. Is this course okay for me?
Yes, networking is all about making connections. You can use networking in any major, career, orlocation.

Program overview

Are you an IT professional new to project management or a manager who wants to develop more robust project management skills? Perhaps you are looking to forge a career as a full-time project manager (PM). This program will introduce you to the fundamentals of project management, specifically as they apply to the field of information technology (IT).

This program will help you select project management techniques and strategies that best fit your IT project or organization. You’ll also explore how project management offices are organized and how they develop a project portfolio. Throughout the program, you’ll come to understand some of the challenges of the field, including management of diverse teams and projects that are potentially based anywhere in the world. By the end, you’ll determine your own competencies as an IT project manager and will have developed core skills required for this role.

 

What will you learn

  • Why IT organizations use project management to deliver business value and how organizational culture can influence the role of the PM and individual projects;
  • How to describe and distinguish among the major project management methodologies and project lifecycles as applied to IT and to identify strategies for managing distributed teams;
  • The purpose of a Project Management Office (PMO), high-level strategies to set up, maintain, and close a PMO, and how it can work within your organization;
  • Techniques to intake, prioritize, and select projects and programs so that they align with an organization’s overall business strategy; and
  • Which personal and performance competencies are necessary for project management in IT, and strategies for developing those skills.

Program Class List

1
Strategic Applications of IT Project & Program Management

Course Details
In this course you will learn project management standards and frameworks that increase efficiency and deliver tangible business benefits.

2
Portfolio Management, Governance, & the PMO

Course Details
Learn how a Project Management Office (PMO) works, discover techniques to monitor and control projects and find out how to keep your project portfolio healthy.

3
Leadership and Management for PM Practitioners in IT

Course Details
Learn how to develop effective project management and leadership skills that are essential for successfully guiding diverse or distributed teams and projects.

Meet Your Instructors

Debra Hildebrand

Instructor of Project Management at University of Washington
Debra Hildebrand has over 15 years’ experience in project management consulting and training for private firms and public agencies (federal, state and local level). Her specialties include strategic planning and implementation, organizational redesign and restructure, project management, and quality assurance oversight. Certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute, Debra is an instructor at the University of Washington, Stanford University, and City University of Seattle. She has an MBA from the Columbia Business School and is the principal of Hildebrand Solutions, a project management training and consultation firm.

Luke Panezich

Instructor of Project Management at University of Washington
Luke Panezich is a senior-level PPM practitioner and an active PMP, PMI-ACP and CSM. He’s implemented predictive, iterative and adaptive frameworks, helping organizations realize business benefits by turning strategies into IT products and services. As a project management coach and practitioner, he has led and managed teams through all stages of the project management and systems development life cycles. Certificated as a trainer and curriculum designer in Agile and other project management methodologies, Luke is an instructor for the University of Washington and serves on the board for PMI’s Puget Sound chapter. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army and has a Master's of Engineering Management from St. Martin's University.

About this course:

What is a PMO, and how does it work?

This course focuses on the Project Management Office (PMO) and the governance techniques used to monitor and control the delivery of projects and programs.

You’ll learn all about Portfolio management and the different kinds of PMOs in use today. You’ll also explore various approaches for building, maintaining and closing a PMO, as well as monitoring techniques to ensure that projects are completed successfully.

What you’ll learn

By the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Explain what a PMO is and why it exists Describe how a PMO works within the broader organization
  • Identify and describe high-level strategies to set up, maintain, and wind down a PMO
  • Understand the techniques to intake, prioritize, and select projects and programs so that they align with the organization’s overall business strategy

 

Meet Your Instructors

Luke Panezich

Instructor of Project Management at University of Washington
Luke Panezich is a senior-level PPM practitioner and an active PMP, PMI-ACP and CSM. He’s implemented predictive, iterative and adaptive frameworks, helping organizations realize business benefits by turning strategies into IT products and services. As a project management coach and practitioner, he has led and managed teams through all stages of the project management and systems development life cycles. Certificated as a trainer and curriculum designer in Agile and other project management methodologies, Luke is an instructor for the University of Washington and serves on the board for PMI’s Puget Sound chapter. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army and has a Master's of Engineering Management from St. Martin's University.

About this course:

Do you have the skills to be an effective project manager in a global market?

This course focuses on leadership and management competencies, along with the ways that different organizational cultures can influence project management.

In this course, you’ll learn the personal and performance competencies required of project managers. You’ll also explore organizational culture and see how a team’s dynamics affect a project. Finally, you’ll delve into team composition and communications, as well as the links between organizational change management and readiness.

What you’ll learn

By the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Identify personal and performance competencies for project management
  • Build a plan for developing required project management competencies
  • Analyze how team dynamics and culture can influence a project
  • Link organizational change management to customer service and delivery readiness
  • Comprehend strategies for managing distributed team projects

Meet Your Instructors

Luke Panezich

Instructor of Project Management at University of Washington
Luke Panezich is a senior-level PPM practitioner and an active PMP, PMI-ACP and CSM. He’s implemented predictive, iterative and adaptive frameworks, helping organizations realize business benefits by turning strategies into IT products and services. As a project management coach and practitioner, he has led and managed teams through all stages of the project management and systems development life cycles. Certificated as a trainer and curriculum designer in Agile and other project management methodologies, Luke is an instructor for the University of Washington and serves on the board for PMI’s Puget Sound chapter. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army and has a Master's of Engineering Management from St. Martin's University.

Debra Hildebrand

Instructor of Project Management at University of Washington
Debra Hildebrand has over 15 years’ experience in project management consulting and training for private firms and public agencies (federal, state and local level). Her specialties include strategic planning and implementation, organizational redesign and restructure, project management, and quality assurance oversight. Certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute, Debra is an instructor at the University of Washington, Stanford University, and City University of Seattle. She has an MBA from the Columbia Business School and is the principal of Hildebrand Solutions, a project management training and consultation firm.