About This Course:

In the course, we will examine the concept of IoT. We will look at the ‘things’ that make up the Internet of Things, including how those components are connected together, how they communicate, and how they value add to the data generated. We will also examine cybersecurity and privacy issues, and highlight how IoT can optimize processes and improve efficiencies in your business.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Gain a deep appreciation of the IoT
  • Understand what constitutes an IoT design solution
  • Start to grow the seeds of IoT ideas within your field and area of expertise

Meet Your Instructors:

Iain Murray AM

Iain is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University, specialising in networking, embedded systems and assistive technology. He received his B.Eng(Hons) and Ph.D. in Computer Systems Engineering from Curtin in 1998, and 2008, respectively. He is a Curtin Academy Fellow and was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for his contributions to education in 2016.

Siavash Khaksar

Siavash is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University. He received his B.Sci in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from Azad University, Science and Research branch in Fars in 2012, his M.Eng in Electrical Engineering with a focus on Embedded Systems from Curtin University in 2015, and is currently undertaking post-graduate research focusing on assistive technology and use of motion sensors and machine learning to help children with cerebral palsy. He specialises in embedded systems and digital hardware-software codesign.

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About This Course:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is expanding at a rapid rate, and it is becoming increasingly important for professionals to understand what it is, how it works, and how to harness its power to improve your business.

In this course we will focus on how the IoT works. You will learn about IoT networks and explore how ‘things’ connect to it, including whether the connection and processing is local (fog) or remote (cloud).

We will explore data networks, connection types, layer models and analyze IoT protocols and standards.

You’ll also learn how to evaluate different infrastructure components and network systems, and how to go about designing a basic network for your own IoT ideas.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Understand the component parts of an IoT network and its connections
  • Evaluate different infrastructure components and network systems
  • Analyse protocols and determine best fit for different IoT applications
  • Design the basic network for your own IoT ideas

Meet Your Instructors:

Iain Murray AM

Iain is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University, specialising in networking, embedded systems and assistive technology. He received his B.Eng(Hons) and Ph.D. in Computer Systems Engineering from Curtin in 1998, and 2008, respectively. He is a Curtin Academy Fellow and was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for his contributions to education in 2016.

Siavash Khaksar

Siavash is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University. He received his B.Sci in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from Azad University, Science and Research branch in Fars in 2012, his M.Eng in Electrical Engineering with a focus on Embedded Systems from Curtin University in 2015, and is currently undertaking post-graduate research focusing on assistive technology and use of motion sensors and machine learning to help children with cerebral palsy. He specialises in embedded systems and digital hardware-software codesign.

Nazanin Mohammadi

Nazanin Mohammadi is a computer network and IT specialist in educational environments. She has been developing and delivering materials for computer systems and networking laboratories in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Curtin for the past 10 years. In 2015, Nazanin received the Vice-Chancellor’s Excellence Award in Innovation for design and implementation of the remote collaborative engineering laboratory environment. She is also amongst a few certified Cisco Networking Academy Instructor trainers in Australia. Nazanin is actively engaged in developing new pedagogies in teaching science and engineering courses as part of her PhD research.

Who can take this course?

Unfortunately, learners from one or more of the following countries or regions will not be able to register for this course: Iran, Cuba and the Crimea region of Ukraine. While edX has sought licenses from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) to offer our courses to learners in these countries and regions, the licenses we have received are not broad enough to allow us to offer this course in all locations. edX truly regrets that U.S. sanctions prevent us from offering all of our courses to everyone, no matter where they live.

About This Course:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is expanding at a rapid rate, and it is becoming increasingly important for professionals to understand what it is, how it works, and how to harness its power to improve business. This introductory course will enable learners to leverage their business and/or technical knowledge across IoT-related functions in the workplace.

In the course, we will examine the concept of IoT. We will look at the ‘things’ that make up the Internet of Things, including how those components are connected together, how they communicate, and how they value add to the data generated. We will also examine cybersecurity and privacy issues, and highlight how IoT can optimize processes and improve efficiencies in your business.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Gain a deep appreciation of the IoT
  • Understand what constitutes an IoT design solution
  • Start to grow the seeds of IoT ideas within your field and area of expertise

Meet Your Instructors:

Iain Murray AM

Iain is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University, specialising in networking, embedded systems and assistive technology. He received his B.Eng(Hons) and Ph.D. in Computer Systems Engineering from Curtin in 1998, and 2008, respectively. He is a Curtin Academy Fellow and was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for his contributions to education in 2016.

Siavash Khaksar

Siavash is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University. He received his B.Sci in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from Azad University, Science and Research branch in Fars in 2012, his M.Eng in Electrical Engineering with a focus on Embedded Systems from Curtin University in 2015, and is currently undertaking post-graduate research focusing on assistive technology and use of motion sensors and machine learning to help children with cerebral palsy. He specialises in embedded systems and digital hardware-software codesign.

About This Course:

As the Internet of Things (IoT) continues to grow so will the number of privacy and security concerns and issues. As a professional working in the field, it is essential to understand the potential security risks and how to best mitigate them.

In this course, you will learn about security and privacy issues in IoT environments. We’ll explore the organizational risks posed by IoT networks, and the principles of IoT device vulnerabilities. We’ll also look at software and hardware IoT Applications for industry.

With billions of devices tracking our every move, privacy is a critical issue. We will explore and discuss the social and commercial implications the IoT brings to society.

 

What You’ll Learn:

  • Identify and analyse IoT security and privacy risks
  • Concept design for secure hardware and software
  • Analyse the social and privacy impacts of the IoT.

Meet Your Instructors:

Iain Murray AM

Iain is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University, specialising in networking, embedded systems and assistive technology. He received his B.Eng(Hons) and Ph.D. in Computer Systems Engineering from Curtin in 1998, and 2008, respectively. He is a Curtin Academy Fellow and was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for his contributions to education in 2016.

Nazanin Mohammadi

Nazanin Mohammadi is a computer network and IT specialist in educational environments. She has been developing and delivering materials for computer systems and networking laboratories in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Curtin for the past 10 years. In 2015, Nazanin received the Vice-Chancellor’s Excellence Award in Innovation for design and implementation of the remote collaborative engineering laboratory environment. She is also amongst a few certified Cisco Networking Academy Instructor trainers in Australia. Nazanin is actively engaged in developing new pedagogies in teaching science and engineering courses as part of her PhD research.

Eleanor Sandry

Eleanor is a Senior Lecturer in Internet Studies at Curtin University. Her first degree was in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University. More recently, she completed a Masters in Communication Studies followed by a PhD in Communication and Cultural Studies at the University of Western Australia. Her research uses a range of communication theories and philosophies of technology to drive analyses of human-technology interactions and relations. She is particularly interested in the ways human-robot communication, where robots need not be humanlike in form, behaviour or intelligence, can support collaboration between humans and robots to complete joint tasks in the home, at work or in social spaces.

Siavash Khaksar

Siavash is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University. He received his B.Sci in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from Azad University, Science and Research branch in Fars in 2012, his M.Eng in Electrical Engineering with a focus on Embedded Systems from Curtin University in 2015, and is currently undertaking post-graduate research focusing on assistive technology and use of motion sensors and machine learning to help children with cerebral palsy. He specialises in embedded systems and digital hardware-software codesign.

Who can take this course?

Unfortunately, learners from one or more of the following countries or regions will not be able to register for this course: Iran, Cuba and the Crimea region of Ukraine. While edX has sought licenses from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) to offer our courses to learners in these countries and regions, the licenses we have received are not broad enough to allow us to offer this course in all locations. edX truly regrets that U.S. sanctions prevent us from offering all of our courses to everyone, no matter where they live.

About this course

The Internet of Things is creating massive quantities of data, and managing and analysing it requires a unique approach to programming and statistics for distributed data sources.

This course will teach introductory programming concepts that allow connection to, and implementation of some functionality on, IoT devices, using the Python programming language. In addition, students will learn how to use Python to process text log files, such as those generated automatically by IoT sensors and other network-connected systems.

Learners do not need prior programming experience to undertake this course, and will not learn a specific programming language – however Python will be used for demonstrations. This course will focus on learning by working through realistic examples.

What you’ll learn

  • Appreciate the software needs of an IoT project
  • Understand how data is managed in an IoT network
  • Apply software solutions for different systems and Big Data to your IoT concept designs
  • Create Python scripts to manage large data files collected from sensor data and interact with the real world via actuators and other output devices.

Meet your instructors

Iain Murray AM

Iain is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University, specialising in networking, embedded systems and assistive technology. He received his B.Eng(Hons) and Ph.D. in Computer Systems Engineering from Curtin in 1998, and 2008, respectively. He is a Curtin Academy Fellow and was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for his contributions to education in 2016.

Siavash Khaksar

Siavash is an academic in the School of Electrical Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences at Curtin University. He received his B.Sci in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from Azad University, Science and Research branch in Fars in 2012, his M.Eng in Electrical Engineering with a focus on Embedded Systems from Curtin University in 2015, and is currently undertaking post-graduate research focusing on assistive technology and use of motion sensors and machine learning to help children with cerebral palsy. He specialises in embedded systems and digital hardware-software codesign.

What you will learn

  • Map significant milestones in the emergence of social media
  • Identify how different users are impacted by digital in/accessibility
  • Extrapolate current social trends online and map possible directions in social media
  • Understand how people interpret robots and bots as communicating, social, even emotional, others

Program Overview

Online communication and digital technologies dominate our everyday lives, extend our abilities, and change the way we communicate with each other. This series brings together three Internet Studies MOOCS:

  • NET1x will increase learners’ understandings of social media by looking at the ways networked connectivity let users become ‘social’
  • NET2x further explores the way digital technologies and social media channels impact our daily routines and transform how we live, using people with disability as a case study. Learners will be introduced to the social model of disability and the ways negative attitudes affect digital accessibility and representation.
  • Continuing the theme of human reliance on technologies, NET3x explores how people communicate with robots and bots in everyday life, both now and into the future.

Courses in this program

1
Social Media: How Media Got Social

Course Details
Discover where social media came from, how it became integral to our everyday lives, and how that has changed the way we communicate.

2
Disability and Digital Media: Accessibility, Representation and Inclusion

Course Details
In Disability and Digital Media: Accessibility, Representation and Inclusion , we will explore the relationship between digital technologies and disability in the Internet age.

3
Communicating with Robots and Bots

Course Details
Robots and bots are being developed to populate our homes, workplaces and social spaces, as well as the online spaces we frequent. How do people communicate with robots and bots? What does the future hold for human-robot communication and collaboration

Meet your instructors

Gwyneth Peaty

Gwyneth is a sessional academic in Internet Studies at Curtin University. She completed a PhD exploring the grotesque in popular culture, and her wider research interests include monstrosity, post-humanism, horror and the Gothic.

Eleanor Sandry

Eleanor is a Senior Lecturer in Internet Studies at Curtin University. Her first degree was in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University. More recently, she completed a Masters in Communication Studies followed by a PhD in Communication and Cultural Studies at the University of Western Australia. Her research uses a range of communication theories and philosophies of technology to drive analyses of human-technology interactions and relations. She is particularly interested in the ways human-robot communication, where robots need not be humanlike in form, behaviour or intelligence, can support collaboration between humans and robots to complete joint tasks in the home, at work or in social spaces.

Tama Leaver

Tama Leaver is an Associate Professor of Internet Studies at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia and a frequent expert media commentator. His research interests include online identity, social media, digital death, infancy online, mobile gaming and the changing landscape of media distribution. He has published in a number of journals including Popular Communication, Media International Australia, First Monday, Comparative Literature Studies, Social Media and Society, Communication Research and Practice and the Fibreculture journal. He is also the author of 'Artificial Culture: Identity, Technology and Bodies' (Routledge, 2012); co-editor of 'An Education in Facebook? Higher Education and the World’s Largest Social Network' (Routledge, 2014) with Mike Kent; and 'Social, Casual and Mobile Games: The Changing Gaming Landscape' (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016) with Michele Willson. Tama has received teaching awards from the University of Western Australia, Curtin University, and in 2012 received a national Australian Award for Teaching Excellence in the Humanities and the Arts.

Katie Ellis

Mike Kent

About this course

Although there are some robots you might never get to meet (or might hope you never meet), such as those sent to space, war or rescue situations, many other robots and bots are being developed to populate people’s homes, the online spaces they frequent, their workplaces, and the social spaces they visit.

This course explores how people communicate with robots and bots in everyday life, both now and into the future.

Module 1 discusses the difficulties of defining what a robot is, as well as briefly introducing bots.

Module 2 focuses on bots, chatbots and socialbots in detail, to consider how people communicate with these programs in online spaces, as well as some ethical questions these interactions raise.

Robots in the home are the subject of Module 3, with a discussion of robots designed to act as personal assistants leading into some examples of assistive and care robots, as well as telepresence robots that allow people to interact with one another at a distance through a robot.

Module 4 considers robots at work, from the potential of telepresence robots to enable remote operations, to robots designed to share people’s workspaces, and potentially even take their jobs. One example of a public space where robots might alter people’s working and social lives greatly is on the roads with the development of self-driving vehicles, robots that need to be able to communicate with their passengers as well as with other road users.

What you’ll learn

  • Some ways to define what robots and bots are
  • How people interpret robots and bots as communicating, social, even emotional others
  • Whether robots and bots need to communicate in humanlike ways to be understood
  • The potential of robots with non-humanlike form, behaviour and communication

Syllabus

Module 1: Robots, bots and communication

  • How robots are presented in popular culture and the media
  • Ways to define a robot
  • Why people build (or don’t build) humanoid or humanlike robots
  • The difference between robots and bots

Module 2: Bots and social bots

  • What it’s like to interact with some bots
  • How and why bots are designed to be humanlike in order to be ‘socialbots’
  • Broader conceptions of bots and their activities in digital spaces
  • Socialbots and bots as they become more specifically embodied

Module 3: Robots in the home

  • The potential of more sophisticated robots designed to act as personal assistants
  • Robots that do more practical work around the home
  • Assistive and care robots, designed to help older adults and people with disabilities of all ages
  • Telepresence robots that allow people to interact with one another at a distance in more flexible and active ways than teleconferencing technologies such as Skype or Facetime

Module 4: Robots at work and on the road

  • Remote operations as an extension of telepresence
  • Robots at work more generally and the question of whether your job might be at risk
  • The introduction of self-driving and semi-autonomous vehicles onto road systems also populated with human drivers, cyclists and pedestrians
  • How ethics can be built into robots and the importance of ethics for designers and manufacturers of robotic technologies

Meet your instructors

Eleanor Sandry

Eleanor is a Senior Lecturer in Internet Studies at Curtin University. Her first degree was in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University. More recently, she completed a Masters in Communication Studies followed by a PhD in Communication and Cultural Studies at the University of Western Australia. Her research uses a range of communication theories and philosophies of technology to drive analyses of human-technology interactions and relations. She is particularly interested in the ways human-robot communication, where robots need not be humanlike in form, behaviour or intelligence, can support collaboration between humans and robots to complete joint tasks in the home, at work or in social spaces.

Gwyneth Peaty

Gwyneth is a sessional academic in Internet Studies at Curtin University. She completed a PhD exploring the grotesque in popular culture, and her wider research interests include monstrosity, post-humanism, horror and the Gothic.

Who can take this course?

Unfortunately, learners from one or more of the following countries or regions will not be able to register for this course: Iran, Cuba and the Crimea region of Ukraine. While edX has sought licenses from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) to offer our courses to learners in these countries and regions, the licenses we have received are not broad enough to allow us to offer this course in all locations. EdX truly regrets that U.S. sanctions prevent us from offering all of our courses to everyone, no matter where they live.

About this course

In Disability and Digital Media , we will explore the relationship between digital technologies and disability in the Internet age.We will consider:

  • the evolving impact of social media on representations of disability;
  • the politics of experiencing, embodying, and discussing disability online;
  • the presence of disability in memes, viral content, and online culture; and
  • the role of accessibility in the digital world.

What you’ll learn

You will learn about:

  • Social and medical models of disability;
  • Key concepts and terminology for understanding digital disability;
  • How social media is changing representations of disability;
  • The opportunities and challenges of representing disability online;
  • How memes and viral content are being used by disability activists;
  • How the tools of digital accessibility can benefit all media users.

Syllabus

Module 1: Introducing digital disability

Module 2:Disability and social media

Module 3: Accessibility and the digital world

Module 4: The future of digital disability

Meet your instructors

Gwyneth Peaty

Gwyneth is a sessional academic in Internet Studies at Curtin University. She completed a PhD exploring the grotesque in popular culture, and her wider research interests include monstrosity, post-humanism, horror and the Gothic.

Katie Ellis

Mike Kent

About this course

Social media and online communication dominate our daily lives in an unprecedented manner. Wireless connectivity, mobile devices and wearable technologies mean that social media is always on, always part of everyday life for billions of people across the world.

While the term ‘social media’ is barely a decade old, the story of how people started using the internet in a social manner is a much longer and more interesting one. This course will increase learners’ understanding of social media by looking at the ways networked connectivity let users become ‘social’, how this was amplified with the emergence of the web, and how social media became the default mode of the mobile web we use today.

What you’ll learn

By completing this course, you should be able to:

  • Map significant milestones in the emergence of social media
  • Differentiate between ‘Web 2.0’ and participatory culture
  • Understand the differences in the way users and social media companies utilise and think about social media
  • Extrapolate current social trends online and map possible directions in social media.

Syllabus

Module 1: Social Media before the Web
Examines social tools, protocols and ways of communicating that developed in the first two decades of the internet, and the surprising dominance of social communication using networks that were initially designed for very different purposes.

  • The internet’s first ‘killer app’: email
  • Newsgroups and BBS Bulletin Boards
  • The emergence of online communities
  • Aliases, avatars and pseudonyms: identity experimentation.

Module2: Web 2.0 and Participatory Culture
Examines the explosion of networked interaction after the emergence of the World Wide Web in the 1990s, through to the most well-known early examples of social media: blogs and wikis.

  • Blogs: the democratisation of publication
  • Wikis: participatory culture, collective intelligence and the emergence of the Wikipedia
  • ‘Web 2.0’ and the selling of social media
  • The emergence of social presence: you are your web presence.

Module3: Social Platforms
Examines the way that the dominant social media platforms took centre stage, and how these spaces made social media a normal part of everyday life and changed political communication.

  • Facebook: how people became profiles
  • Twitter: how 140 characters became the new politics
  • Google’s YouTube: social meets video, and the challenges of building communities on ever-expanding platforms
  • The ‘real name’ web: the push to make online and offline identities the same.

Module4: Social Goes Everywhere: The Mobile Web
Examines the way social media changes when phones and tablets let users be online at every moment, in every place and space, and how devices, not just people, start to send social signals.

  • Snapchat and Instagram: mobile, visual and the communication that deletes-by-default
  • Locative media: how places are augmented by a social layer
  • Wearables: FitBits and trackers as social media
  • Owning big data: are users a source of big data, and how might that be used?

Meet your instructors

Tama Leaver

Tama Leaver is an Associate Professor of Internet Studies at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia and a frequent expert media commentator. His research interests include online identity, social media, digital death, infancy online, mobile gaming and the changing landscape of media distribution. He has published in a number of journals including Popular Communication, Media International Australia, First Monday, Comparative Literature Studies, Social Media and Society, Communication Research and Practice and the Fibreculture journal. He is also the author of 'Artificial Culture: Identity, Technology and Bodies' (Routledge, 2012); co-editor of 'An Education in Facebook? Higher Education and the World’s Largest Social Network' (Routledge, 2014) with Mike Kent; and 'Social, Casual and Mobile Games: The Changing Gaming Landscape' (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016) with Michele Willson. Tama has received teaching awards from the University of Western Australia, Curtin University, and in 2012 received a national Australian Award for Teaching Excellence in the Humanities and the Arts.

Gwyneth Peaty

Gwyneth is a sessional academic in Internet Studies at Curtin University. She completed a PhD exploring the grotesque in popular culture, and her wider research interests include monstrosity, post-humanism, horror and the Gothic.

About this course

In this course, you’ll take on the role of a communications manager for a fictional organisation, making key decisions that will affect its online reputation.

You will experience:

  • how to build a robust and sustainable online reputation
  • the positives of building a strong participatory culture
  • how to manage social media issues based on a real-life examples
  • how to manage a crisis and respond appropriately across multiple platforms.

Throughout the course, you’ll learn from real life case studies and gain an understanding of the important role that blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and other social platforms play in today’s business world.

The digital landscape is fast-paced and continually changing, yet is an equally challenging and exciting environment in which to work. This course is relevant to anyone working in marketing, communications, public relations, social media and advertising.

This course is part of the CurtinX MicroMasters Credential in Marketing in a Digital World that is specifically designed to teach the critical skills needed to be successful in this exciting field. In order to qualify for the MicroMasters Credential you will need to earn a Verified Certificate in each of the five courses.

 

What you’ll learn

  • You’ll learn how to:
    • manage an organisation’s online reputation
    • apply reputational management principles to manage online issues and crises
    • build a strong participatory culture to engage your audience.

Meet Your Instructors

Bridget Tombleson

Lecturer, Public Relations at Curtin University Bridget is a PR professional with sixteen years’ experience in public relations, media relations, issues management, strategy development and internal communications. Bridget has worked in government, corporate and consultancy roles in Australia and overseas. She has developed a new unit called Transmedia Storytelling for the Public Relations course at Curtin University.

Katharina Wolf

Senior Lecturer, Public Relations at Curtin University Dr. Katharina Wolf is a senior lecturer and coordinator of the public relations major. Katharina has over fifteen years of communications and media experience as an educator and practitioner. Her industry experience encompasses communications and research roles in Germany, Spain, the United Kingdom and Australia. Katharina is passionate about providing emerging communicators with a voice and further building the profile of the public relations industry. She is an active member of the Public Relations Institute of Australia's (PRIA) West Australian State Council, the immediate past President of PRIA WA, a Director on the national PRIA Board, a former Chairperson of PRIA Young Guns and Acting Chairperson of the Institute’s national Education Community Committee.